Employment Opportunities

The Melbourne Medical School employs people in several different teaching support programs as listed below. For other job opportunities within the University of Melbourne please navigate to the University of Melbourne Jobs and Careers website.

Simulated Patient Program

Simulated Patients are specially trained to portray patients realistically and consistently in simulated clinical encounters such as medical interviews. Established in 1995, the Simulated Patient Program is now a vital part of undergraduate and post graduate medical education at The University of Melbourne. The Program is also used for research projects in the health field where the realistic portrayal of patients is required.

Simulated Patients are recruited from the community, and many are trained actors. They represent different parts of society, and vary in terms of age, culture, language, ethnicity and life experience.

Whilst many of the Simulated Patient Program activities are based in Melbourne, some are conducted in rural centres including Shepparton, Ballarat and Wangaratta.

To be considered to join this program, applicants must first attend an Information Session. See below for upcoming sessions and registration.

Information Sessions

We are currently not recruiting.
Please send expressions of interest to simpatient-info@unimelb.edu.au.

Find out more.

Indigenous Simulated Patient Program

As many medical students have had minimal personal contact with the Indigenous community, our Simulated Patient Program is always looking to recruit Indigenous people from all age groups, to provide students with a better understanding of health issues which are more commonly faced by the Indigenous community.

To find out more about becoming an Indigenous Simulated Patient, please contact:

Simulated Patient Program Coordinator
+61 (3) 9035 5298
simpatient-info@unimelb.edu.au

Clinical Teaching Associates

Clinical Teaching Associates (CTA) are a group of motivated women committed to the improvement of women's health.

They are women from the community who teach medical students and healthcare providers the skills necessary for sensitive female examinations. They are trained to teach whilst having breast and gynaecological examinations, giving specialised guidance and feedback on technical and interpersonal skills.

CTAs provide training to Victorian medical students, International Medical Graduates, Hospital Medical Officers, General Practice Vocational Training Registrars, Practice nurses, Preceptors and established General Practitioners for continuing medical education. CTAs participate in intensive, regular and ongoing training to ensure a quality program.

CTAs also participate in the development of multimedia teaching tools, and research to contribute to the ongoing base of evidence, which supports women's health initiatives.

More information about the program is available or you may be interested in applying to become a CTA.

Becoming a CTA

Urological Teaching Associates

Urological Teaching Associates (UTAs) are a group of motivated men committed to the improvement of men's health.

They are men from the community specifically trained to provide teaching and feedback to medical students and health care providers. UTAs teach the fine technical and interpersonal skills required in hernia, genital and prostate examinations. Whilst being examined, they provide specialised guidance and feedback to enhance the participant's sensitive examination skills.

UTAs also participate in the development of multimedia teaching tools and research to contribute to the ongoing base of evidence which supports men's health initiatives.

More information about the program is available or you may be interested in applying to become a UTA.

Becoming a UTA

Patient Volunteer Program

Volunteers are regularly required for the assessment of students' physical examination skills in OSCEs (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations) in the early part of the medical course. Students may be required to conduct a physical examination (for example, of the abdomen) on a patient volunteer, or to perform a procedure (such as fitting a sling). More invasive procedures, such as suturing, are done in combination with special equipment and are not actually performed on volunteers.

Patient volunteers must be prepared to be examined and may need to remove some items of clothing. No acting is required. Volunteers can assist for either a half-day or full day, and are given a gift voucher for their efforts.

If you wish to be involved in this program, or would like more information, please contact:

Simulated Patient Program Coordinator
+61 (3) 9035 5298
simpatient-info@unimelb.edu.au