CORe Unit (Clinical Outcomes Research Unit)

Research Overview

Logo for the CORe Unit

Large observational data are transforming medicine. While randomised clinical trials provide primary evidence about the efficacy of clinical interventions, it is the observational data that inform clinical practice about the role of therapies in the context of different treatment strategies, prognostics, individual treatment response (being a requisite of precision medicine) but also generate hypotheses about aetiology and pathogenesis of disease.

The CORe Unit collaborates with clinical teams within and without the Parkville precinct, providing expertise in advanced analytics of existing or emerging clinical databases. Rather than service provision, CORe fosters collaborative relationships. The CORe analysts are involved in conceptualisation and interpretation of research projects and work closely with principal investigators from other research teams, providing expertise in analytics as well as insight into the subject of their research.

The goal of the Unit is to equip clinical researchers with the armamentarium needed to analyse their research projects. CORe welcomes students and fellows from other clinical units to pursue their research projects jointly with our analysts.

Staff

  • A/Prof Tomas Kalincik, Research Group Leader
  • Dr William Brown, Research fellow 
  • Dr Amy Kunchok, Research fellow 
  • Dr Ai-Lan Nguyen, PhD student
  • Ms Jordana Hughes, MD student 
  • Mr Adam Fambiatos, MD student 
  • Mr Jae-Kwan Jake Jun, MD student  
  • Dr Johannes Lorscheider, Research associate 
  • Dr Anna He, Research associate 
  • Mr Nathaniel Lizak, Research associate 
  • Mr Luke Perry, Research associate 
  • Mr Jiah Wallace, Research associate

Collaborators

The CORe Unit collaborates with observational registries, in particular, MSBase, Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry and EpiNet. Our academic partners include researchers at Karolinska Institute, Cambridge University, University College London, University of Basel, Charles University in Prague, Cardiff University, University of Bristol, University College Dublin, Dresden University of Technology, University of Copenhagen, University of Genoa, Vall d’Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona), as well as industry.

Funding

The team's research projects are funded by the National Medical and Health Research Council, Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia, Multiple Sclerosis Society (UK), Biogen and Merck.

Research Publications

  • Merkel B, Butzkueven H, Traboulsee AL, Havrdova E, Kalincik T. (in press) Timing of high-efficacy therapy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: A systematic review. Autoimmun Rev, accepted 26/02/2017
  • Kalincik T, Brown JWL, Robertson N, Willis M, Scolding N, Rice CM et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2017) Comparison of alemtuzumab with natalizumab, fingolimod, and interferon beta for multiple sclerosis: a longitudinal study. Lancet Neurol 16(4):271-81
  • Lizak N, Lugaresi A, Alroughani R et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2017) Highly active immunomodulatory therapy ameliorates accumulation of disability in moderately advanced and advanced multiple sclerosis. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 88:196-203
  • Kalincik T, Kuhle J, Pucci E, Rojas JI, Tsolaki M, Sirbu CA et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (in press) Data quality evaluation for observational multiple sclerosis registries. Mult Scler, accepted 13/07/2016
  • Lorscheider J, Buzzard K, Jokubaitis V, Spelman T, Havrdova E et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2016) Defining secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Brain 139(9):2395
  • Stewart T, Spelman T, Havrdova E et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2017) Contribution of different relapse phenotypes to disability in multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler 23(2):266-276
  • Kalincik T, Cutter G, Spelman T, Jokubaitis V, Havrdova E, Horakova D et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2015) Defining reliable disability outcomes in multiple sclerosis. Brain 138:3287-98
  • Warrender-Sparkes M, Spelman T, Izquierdo G et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2016) The effect of oral immunomodulatory therapy on treatment uptake and persistence in multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler 22(4):520-325
  • Kalincik T, Horakova D, Spelman T, Jokubaitis V, Trojano M, Lugaresi A et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2015) Switch to natalizumab vs fingolimod in active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Ann Neurol 77(3):425-35
  • He A, Spelman T, Jokubaitis VG, Havrdova E, Horakova D, Trojano M et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2015) Comparison of switch to fingolimod or interferon beta/glatiramer acetate in active multiple sclerosis. JAMA Neurology 72(4):405-413
  • Kalincik T, Jokubaitis V, Izquierdo G, Duquette P, Girard M, Grammond P et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2015) Comparative effectiveness of glatiramer acetate and interferon beta formulations in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler 21(9):1159-71
  • Kalincik T, Buzzard K, Jokubaitis V, Trojano M, Izquierdo G, Duquette P et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2014) Risk of relapse phenotype recurrence in multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler 20(11), 1511-1522
  • Kalincik T, Vivek V, Jokubaitis VG, Lechner Scott J, Trojano M, Izquierdo G et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2013) Sex as a determinant of relapse incidence and progressive course of multiple sclerosis. Brain 136:3609-3617
  • Kalincik T, Spelman T, Trojano M, Duquette P, Izquierdo G et al., on behalf of the MSBase Study Group (2013) Persistence on therapy and propensity matched outcome comparison of two subcutaneous interferon beta 1a dosages for multiple sclerosis. PLoS One 8:e63480