Departmental Seminars

Every week on Monday, until 10 Nov 2019
-

2019 Seminars Series

(no RSVP required)

light lunch served from 12.20pm

Next Seminars:

TBC
Monday 29 April 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Quynh-Nhu Nguyen, PhD Candidate
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, The University of Melbourne


Normal tissue effects of Microbeam Radiation Therapy
Monday 6 May 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Jessica Ventura, PhD Student
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne & Royal Women's Hospital

Pregnant woman with doctor

Microbeam Radiation therapy (MRT) is a novel pre-clinical synchrotron-based radiation therapy modality that shows promise in improving cancer control if successfully translated to human clinical trials. Conventional radiotherapy (CRT) is limited by the radiation tolerance of the surrounding healthy normal tissues. MRT represents an ideal substitute to the CRT modalities due to the apparent tolerance of MRT-irradiated normal tissues and improved therapeutic index, which ultimately can improve patient outcomes. The main goal of this study is to understand the mechanisms associated with synchrotron MRT in order to facilitate its use as a radiotherapy treatment for cancer patients. This study will investigate both indirect and direct effects of synchrotron-generated MRT and BB (radiation modality that resembles CRT). The indirect effects include determining the role of radiation parameters and the immune system in the propagation of radiation induced bystander/ abscopal effects (RIBE/RIAE) of synchrotron MRT. The RIBE/RIAE phenomenon is a well-established consequence of ionising radiation comprising of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in out-of-field cells associated with irradiated cells. The direct effects include: determining if g-H2AX (a biomarker of DNA DSBs) is a suitable biodosimeter to measure biologically equivalent valley dose of MRT in mouse skin and human fibroblasts, and to identify key biomarkers that are influenced by MRT and BB irradiation of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). These studies would provide further clues to establish the biological and cellular communication mechanisms that drive the normal tissue sparing effect, a key attribute of MRT.


The National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship at the University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital: An overview of our work
Monday 13 May 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Dr. Arjun Rajkhowa, Centre manager, National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship
Department of Medicine & Radiology,The University of Melbourne

This presentation will provide an overview of a national program focused on surveillance of antimicrobial use in Australia. This program contributes to the Commonwealth Department of Health’s ‘Antimicrobial Use and Resistance in Australia’ project, which delivers Australia’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy (2015-19). Research on antimicrobial use and antimicrobial stewardship (i.e., strategies focused on improving antimicrobial use in healthcare settings) is undertaken by the National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship. Collaboration around the implementation of specific antimicrobial use surveillance and quality improvement projects across specialty units can be supported by the centre.


Genomics to tame tuberculosis
Monday 20 May 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Sarah Dunstan
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease of global importance that lacks effective tools for it’s control and elimination. In 2017 just over 3 people died from TB every minute, and 10 million people fell ill. In this seminar the results of our host and pathogen genomic studies in large TB patient cohorts from Vietnam will be discussed.  Our results demonstrate how pathogen genomics can define the population diversity and spread of Mtb, and investigate drug resistance emergence. Scrutinising both host and pathogen genomic variation can advance our discovery and implementation of rapid diagnostics and new host directed therapies, especially relevant for drug resistant TB, and vaccine development.


Cognitive and brain ageing in the absence of preclinical Alzheimer's disease
Monday 27 May 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Christa Dang, PhD Student
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne

Pregnant woman with doctor

Ageing studies suggest that cognitive decline and cortical atrophy are characteristic of ageing into late-life; however, studies have not taken into consideration the presence of neuropathological changes associated with neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer’s disease or cerebrovascular disease. The magnitude of cognitive decline and cortical atrophy associated with ageing has been overestimated due to inadvertent inclusion of participants with preclinical disease; therefore, more accurate examinations of ageing trajectories require consideration of biomarkers in order to isolate changes associated with ageing per se.


TBC
Monday 3 June 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7D/E

Rocco Cuzzilla
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne


TBC
Monday 17 June 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Erica Plummer
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne

Pregnant woman with doctor


TBC
Monday 24 June 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Zobaida Edib
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne


Correlative imaging using calcium imaging and immunofluorescence in the gastrointestinal tract
Monday 1 July 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Pradeep Rajasekhar, Research Fellow & Simona Carbone, Research Fellow
Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sceinces

Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a cation channel activated by mechanical stimuli, lipid derivatives, and G protein-coupled receptor-mediated signaling cascades. It is involved in visceral hypersensitivity symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Despite its important roles in gut physiology, little is known about the localization of TRPV4. Using in situ calcium imaging and confocal microscopy, we identified novel sites of functional TRPV4 expression in the mouse and primate colon. To determine the functional role of TRPV4 in gut physiology, we used in vitro motility assays to study the movements of the intestine.


TBC
Monday 08 July 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7D/E

TBC
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne


TBC
Monday 15 July 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

TBC
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne


TBC
Monday 22 July 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Prof Jeanie Cheong
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne


The role of decidual mesenchymal stem/stromal cell ageing in labour
Monday 29 July 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

Joan Wijaya, MSc Final Seminar
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne


TBC
Monday 05 August 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

TBC
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne


TBC
Monday 12 August 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

TBC
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne


TBC
Monday 19 August 2019 - 12.30pm - Level 7, RWH Hospital Seminar Room 7A/B

TBC
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,The University of Melbourne

Any queries regarding this seminar, please contact Elise Newman elise.newman@unimelb.edu.au